We are the National Organization for Women at University of Central Florida!
"Why Don’t the Unemployed Get Off Their Couches?" and Eight Other Critical Questions for Americans (via seriouslyamerica)

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nofreedomlove:

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"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

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(Source: softwaring, via hashley00)

originalplumbing:

Hirstory lesson time! When heading to all your “Pride” parties this weekend, don’t forget the people who came before us, those who paved the way, who are often overlooked especially by mainstream LGB(T) “culture”.

Marsha P Johnson was an American transgender rights activist, Queen of Stonewall and Transgender Revolutionary. She was a co-founder of Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (S.T.A.R.) in the early 1970s and became the “mother” of S.T.A.R. House along with Sylvia Rivera. They would get together food and clothing to help support the young trans women living in the house on the lower East Side of NYC.

(via weednymph)

wiscohisto:

On this day in 1966, the National Organization for Women (NOW) was founded in Washington, D.C. 
One of the 28 women who participated in this founding meeting of NOW was Sparta, Wisconsin native Kathryn F. Clarenbach, a professor of political science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. On her death in 1994, the New York Times described Clarenbach as a founder of modern feminism.
This photo shows Professor Clarenbach, seated on the right, with Wisconsin Governor Robert Knowles and the Committee on the Status of Women Midwest Conference in 1967. 
via: The University of Wisconsin Collection, UW-Madison Archives. An oral history interview with Clarenbach is also available through the Archives.

wiscohisto:

On this day in 1966, the National Organization for Women (NOW) was founded in Washington, D.C.

One of the 28 women who participated in this founding meeting of NOW was Sparta, Wisconsin native Kathryn F. Clarenbach, a professor of political science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. On her death in 1994, the New York Times described Clarenbach as a founder of modern feminism.

This photo shows Professor Clarenbach, seated on the right, with Wisconsin Governor Robert Knowles and the Committee on the Status of Women Midwest Conference in 1967. 

via: The University of Wisconsin Collection, UW-Madison Archives. An oral history interview with Clarenbach is also available through the Archives.

(via feminismatuofsc)

tentaclesandteacups:

"I don’t need feminism" is a pretty awesome way of letting me know who I don’t want to have in my life so that’s pretty rad I guess.

positivelypinkie:

Destroy the idea that in gay couples one has to be masculine and one has to be feminine to imitate heterosexuality

(via homoswheretheheartis)

petitsirena:

sticks and stones may break my bones, but language dictates everything from social norms to legislation and it’s indeed often used to bolster violence and oppression sooOo

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onnaollie:

black women get called angry every fucking day but you don’t see us out here shooting up folks at work or schools or bringing kitchen knives to stab people.

nope.

but we’re universally labeled ANGRY BLACK WOMEN.

meanwhile white boys are making youtube videos about WHY DON’T GIRLS WANNA HAVE SEX WITH ME and doing mass shootings. we ain’t gonna hear WHITE MEN ARE ANGRY AND VIOLENT. not at all.

(via nothisisbeyonce)

mustardwketchup:

These Fabulous Swimsuits Are Designed Specifically For Breast Cancer Survivors

And they’re modelled by some seriously glam women.

(via femmsub)

themed by coryjohnny for tumblr